• World Migratory Bird Day 2024

    What is World Migratory Bird Day? World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) is an annual global awareness-raising campaign aimed at celebrating the amazing journeys of migratory birds and inspiring worldwide conservation of migratory birds and their habitats. Traditionally observed on the second Saturday of May and October, the two days of World Migratory Bird Day serve as a means to reflect the cyclical nature of bird migration, as well as the varying peak migration periods in the northern and southern hemispheres. In 2024, WMBD will be celebrated on 11th May and 12th October. Today, the campaign shines as a beacon of cooperation, with the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), the African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbird Agreement (AEWA), Environment for the Americas (EFTA), and the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) standing shoulder to shoulder. But fun fact, this collaborative tale first began in October 2017 with the trio CMS, AEWA, and EFTA. In a move reminiscent of the Three Musketeers, they combined strengths, integrating International Migratory Bird Day with World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) to champion the cause of our avian companions. Then, just five years later, on March 17th, the ensemble welcomed a new member as the EAAFP officially entered the fold during the 11th Meeting of Partners (MoP11) in Brisbane, Australia. This fresh partnership heralds an exciting phase in the ongoing quest to raise awareness and safeguard the remarkable voyages of migratory birds around the world. Official website of World Migratory Bird Day: https://www.worldmigratorybirdday.org/ The Theme of World Migratory Bird Day 2024 The theme for this year's World Migratory Bird Day, "Protect Insects, Protect Birds" shines a light on the unsung heroes of the natural world: insects. These tiny creatures are the lifeblood of migratory bird populations, providing crucial energy reserves for birds during their incredible journeys. From benthic chironomids to darting dragonflies, birds depend heavily on a variety of insects during stopovers to sustain their biannual migration every year. However, the decline in insect populations spells trouble for our feathered friends. So, WMBD this year urges immediate action, advocating for reduced pesticide use, organic farming practices, and the preservation of natural habitats. By safeguarding insects, we not only ensure the survival of migratory birds but also protect essential ecosystem functions. For the World Migratory Bird Day 2024 press release by click [here].   Discover 2024's EAA Flyway Species on the WMBD Poster COMMON SNIPE (Gallinago gallinago) Conservation status: IUCN — Least Concern With Europe as their stronghold, Common Snipes embark on journeys that lead them across the expanses of southern Asia to central Africa. Their migration is punctuated by harsh calls echoing through the night, signalling their presence in the moonlit skies. Feasting on insects (and other invertebrates), worms, and small crustaceans, these adaptable birds can forage within muddy habitats with finesse, thanks to their sensitive and flexible bills.             LITTLE CURLEW (Numenius minutus) Conservation status: IUCN — Least Concern Hailing from the vast plains of northern central Siberia, the Little Curlew, the world's smallest among its kind, flocks mostly to northern Australia during the non-breeding season. Standing no taller than your average 30cm school ruler, these birds prefer the hidden depths of dry grasslands, yet sightings on coastal mudflats during migration are not rare. Feeding on a diet ranging from insects to the occasional seed, they employ delicate picking and probing techniques, sometimes even burying their bills in search of sustenance. PHEASANT-TAILED JACANA (Hydrophasianus chirurgus) Conservation status: IUCN — Least Concern Hailing from the tropical landscapes of Asia, stretching from Yemen to the Philippines, the Pheasant-Tailed Jacana traverses, embarking on seasonal journeys across its expansive range. Despite its name, only the breeding-plumaged birds truly sport the majestic "pheasant-tailed" appearance; in winter months, the birds have short tails. Foraging amidst floating vegetation or skimming the water's surface, they feed on a varied diet of insects, molluscs, and other invertebrates. Their unique hunting methods include walking delicately on vegetation and gracefully swimming in the waters below.   Be Part of the WMBD Celebration! 01. Join Us Online Don't forget to register your event on the Global Portal at https://www.worldmigratorybirdday.org/register-your-event 02. Other World Migratory Bird Day 2024 Activities You are invited to join the EAAFP Team on May 11 for the Global Big Day by eBird! Be part of our team and help record migratory waterbirds in the #EAAFlyway! Here's what you need to do: Register for an eBird account. Go out and watch birds, keeping count of the birds you see. Submit your checklist to eBird and share it with "EAAFPTeam"! You can find the "EAAFPTeam" profile here: https://ebird.org/profile/MzgyMzk1NA Resources for World Migratory Bird Day 2024 ­01. EAAFP World Migratory Bird Day 2024 Small Grant The Small Grant Fund for the 2024 World Migratory Bird Day has been established to provide financial support for EAAFP Partners and collaborators from EAAFP Task Forces and Working Groups who plan to organize public events and/or conservation action-oriented workshops at national or local levels for World Migratory Bird Day. We strongly encourage EAAFP Partners and collaborators to apply for any suitable event or development of WMBD materials in local languages that aim to raise awareness of the need to conserve migratory waterbirds and the value of their habitats in the East Asian–Australasian Flyway. For details, visit [here]. 02. World Migratory Bird Day 2024 Trello Board Everything from the WMBD 2024 Trello Board can be downloaded [here]. 03. World Migratory Bird Day 2024 Poster in EAAF Languages World Migratory Bird Day 2024 Global Poster in English    LANGUAGES THEME OF 2024 MAIN TITLE POSTER LINKS  English Protect Insects, Protect Birds World Migratory Bird Day PNG (ENG)  Bengali পোকামাকড় রক্ষা করে পাখির জীবন। বিশ্ব পরিযায়ী পাখি দিবস PNG (BEN)  Burmese ငှက်မျိုးစုံ ကြွယ်ဝဖို့ ပိုးမွှားအင်းဆက်များကို ထိန်းသိမ်းစို့ ကမ္ဘာ့ရွှေ့ပြောင်းငှက်နေ့ PNG (MYA)  Chinese (Simplified) 保护昆虫,保护鸟类 世界候鸟日 PNG (ZHS)  Chinese (Traditional) 保護昆蟲,保護鳥類 世界候鳥日 PNG (ZHT)  Filipino Mga Insekto'y Protektahan, Mga Ibon ay Pangalagaan Pandaigdigang Araw ng mga Ibong Dayo PNG (FIL)  Cebuano/Bisaya Panalipdan ang mga Kalnsektohan, Panalipdan ang mga Kalanggaman Pandaigdigang Araw ng mga Ibong Dayo PNG (CEB/BIS)  Indonesian Serangga Terlindungi, Burung Lestari Hari Migrasi Burung Sedunia PNG (IND)  Japanese 昆虫を守ることは、鳥たちを守ること 世界渡り鳥の日 PNG (JPN)  Khmer ការពារសត្វល្អិត គឺការពារសត្វស្លាប ទិវាសត្វស្លាបទេសន្តរប្រវេសន៍ពិភពលោក PNG (KHM)  Korean (DPRK) (not available) 세계철새의 날 (not available)  Korean (ROK) 곤충을 보호하고 새를 보호합시다 세계 철새의 날 PNG (ROK)  Malay / Bahasa Malaysia Lindungi Serangga, Lindungi Burung Hari Burung Hijrah Sedunia PNG (BM)  Mongolian Шавжгүй бол шувуугүй Дэлхийн нүүдлийн шувуудын өдөр PNG (MON)  Russian Сохраним насекомых, чтобы сохранить птиц Всемирный день перелётных птиц PNG (RUS)  Thai ปกป้องแมลง ปกป้องนก วันนกอพยพโลก PNG (THAI)  Vietnamese Bảo vệ côn trùng là góp phần bảo vệ các loài chim Ngày chim di cư thế giới PNG (VIET)   If you require raw design files for printing or conversion for your local campaign, please contact the EAAFP Secretariat at the following email addresses. Email: [email protected] / [email protected]


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  • Funding Boost for Flyway Activities: Australian Government’s Support and Priorities

    ©Eugene Cheah The Australian Government has extended its support for several key activities of CMS-EAAFP. Four…


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  • World Migratory Bird Day 2023 in Yogyakarta, Indonesia: Fostering Awareness for Water and Bird Conservation

    World Migratory Bird Day 2023 © Endemic Indonesia Society The World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) 2023 was celebrated with great enthusiasm and success in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The event, organized by the Endemic Indonesia Society, aimed to raise awareness about the importance of water for both birds and people, particularly focusing on the conservation of migratory birds in the Progo River Estuary. R. Arif Alfauzi, S.Si delivering his presentation © Endemic Indonesia Society The activities commenced with a school visit to the local school MTs Darul Ulum Galur Kulon Progo on 13th May, 2023. R. Arif Alfauzi, S.Si., an experienced alumnus of UNY(Universitas Negeri Yogyakarta), delivered a presentation on the conservation of migratory birds in the Progo River estuary. Approximately 38 students, 4 teachers, and 10 university students attended the session, gaining valuable insights into the significance of preserving bird habitats. Birdwatching activity at the Progo River estuary © Endemic Indonesia Society Later in the day, birdwatching activities took place near the Progo River estuary in Bantul. Students from MTs Darul Ulum and around 20 university students participated in this event, guided by members of the Yogyakarta Birdwatchers Society. Divided into groups, the participants had the opportunity to observe and identify various bird species. Despite not being the migration season, they were still able to spot species such as the Common Sandpiper, Javan Plover, and Greater Crested Tern. The presence of journalists during the event led to a media article, further spreading awareness about the conservation efforts. To engage a broader audience, an online photo and article competition was conducted from 11th to 24th  May, 2023. Divided into two categories, students and university students, the competition received approximately 30 entries. The submitted works were evaluated, and the winners were announced during the concluding webinar on 27th May. Winner of the photo competition (student division) © Endemic Indonesia Society Winner of the photo competition (university division) © Endemic Indonesia Society Webinar about water and bird conservation in the Progo River © Endemic Indonesia Society The webinar served as the highlight of the WMBD 2023 event. With a theme focused on water and bird conservation in the Progo River, the webinar attracted approximately 80 participants from various backgrounds, where they shared research findings on the dangers of microplastics in the Progo River flow. Throughout the series of activities, the Endemic Indonesia Society recognized the importance of involving the media to raise awareness about migratory bird conservation. It further spread the message beyond the event's immediate participants. Birds found in the Progo River estuary © Endemic Indonesia Society The Progo River estuary holds great significance as a water source for surrounding communities and as a crucial feeding and resting place for migratory birds. The presence of endangered species at the site such as the Great Knot, Nordmann's Greenshank, and Far-eastern Curlew highlights the importance of conservation efforts. However, these birds face numerous threats, including hunting, habitat degradation, and the presence of microplastics in the river flow. The WMBD 2023 activities successfully highlighted these issues and fostered greater awareness and understanding among participants, contributing to the ongoing conservation efforts in Yogyakarta. By organizing educational initiatives and engaging with schools, communities, and decision-makers, the Endemic Indonesia Society and its partners took significant steps toward protecting migratory birds and their habitats. The success of the WMBD 2023 event not only underscored the importance of water for birds and people but also emphasized the need for continued collaboration and action to ensure the long-term survival of these remarkable migratory species in the Progo River estuary. News article 1: EIS and MTS Darul Ulum Kulonprogo Conduct Bird Watching in Muara Progo News article 2: Kali Progo is polluted by microplastics due to trash from baby diapers to mattresses News article 3: Massive sand mining at the mouth of the Progo River threatens the habitat of migratory shorebirds The project was funded through the 2023 EAAFP WMBD Small Grant Fund. View the report, Click here. Article prepared by Endemic Indonesia Society.          


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  • Strengthening Public Awareness: 2023 World Migratory Bird Day Celebrated in Tanguar Haor, Bangladesh

    Nature Eye, a renowned conservation organization, successfully organized the World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) 2023 event at Joypur Government Primary High School in Tanguar Haor, Bangladesh. This significant celebration took place on 13th May, 2023, with the support of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP). The event aimed to raise awareness about the conservation of migratory birds and their habitats, educate participants about wetland importance, and promote the protection of Tanguar Haor—an EAAFP Flyway Network Site and a Ramsar Site. A total of 377 participants, including school students, teachers, and parents from the local community joined the event. A screening of an enlightening documentary titled "Migratory Birds of Tanguar Haor, Bangladesh", which shed light on the diverse avian species found in the region was shown. The documentary explained the migration patterns and emphasized the importance of Tanguar Haor as a crucial habitat for globally threatened and near-threatened species to the audience. Screening of the documentary "Migratory Birds of Tanguar Haor, Bangladesh" © Nature Eye One of the highlights of the event was the birdwatching activity. Students eagerly participated in observing migratory birds, honing their skills in bird identification. Equipped with binoculars, the participants were captivated by the experience of birdwatching, deepening their appreciation for the avian wonders that grace Tanguar Haor. Birdwatching activity at Tanguar Haor © Nature Eye Another important aspect of the event was a lecture on the significance of water for migratory birds, which was the theme of the 2023 WMBD. Participants learned about the crucial role of water habitats in the life cycles of these birds. Wetlands, rivers, lakes, and other water bodies provide essential resources for feeding, drinking, breeding, and rest during their arduous journeys. However, these habitats face threats from human activities, pollution, and climate change. The participants were made aware of the need to protect these vital ecosystems for the conservation of migratory birds. The alarming decline in migratory bird populations visiting Tanguar Haor was also discussed, attributed to factors such as habitat degradation, human pressure, illegal hunting, and water pollution caused by coal collection. Thousands of boats continuously pollute the water, endangering the foraging and roosting grounds of migratory waterbirds. This revelation emphasized the urgency of striking a balance between conservation and sustainable utilization of wetlands. Students participating in the art competition © Nature Eye Students showing their drawings © Nature Eye The event concluded with the students’ art competition where they drew the migratory birds found in Tanguar Haor. The successful celebration of WMBD 2023 in Tanguar Haor by Nature Eye would leave a lasting impact on the participants. They gained a deeper understanding of the ecological importance of migratory birds and wetlands while becoming advocates. The project was funded through the 2023 EAAFP WMBD Small Grant Fund. View the report, Click here. Article prepared by Nature Eye.  


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  • World Migratory Bird Day 2023 highlights impact of the growing water crisis on migratory birds

    BOULDER/BONN/INCHEON, 13 May 2023 – Water and its importance to migratory birds – and the increasing threats to both water quality and quantity -  is the focus of this year’s World Migratory Bird Day, a global campaign that aims to raise awareness of migratory birds and the need for international cooperation to conserve them. Activities to mark the campaign will be held globally on two peak days in May and October under the theme “Water: Sustaining Bird Life” Water is fundamental to sustaining life on our planet. Migratory birds rely on water and its associated habitats—lakes, rivers, streams, ponds, swamps, marshes, and coastal wetlands—for breeding, resting, refueling during migration, and wintering. Yet increasing human demand for water, along with climate change, pollution, and other factors, are threatening these precious aquatic ecosystems. Headlines around the world are sounding alarm: 35 percent of the world’s wetlands, critical to migratory birds, have been lost in the last 50 years. Utah’s Great Salt Lake, the largest saltwater lake in the Western Hemisphere and used by more than a million shorebirds, is in danger of disappearing within five years. Across the Amur-Heilong Basin in Asia, climate change is amplifying the impact of habitat destruction by depleting natural water systems and depriving migratory birds of vital breeding and stopover site.  These sobering examples go hand-in-hand with recent reports that reveal that 48 percent of bird species worldwide are undergoing population declines. Another poignant example is that of the Aral Sea shared by Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.  Once the fourth-largest lake in the world,  it is widely regarded as one of the planet’s worst water-related environmental disasters. Soviet-era irrigation projects almost completely dried up the lake, which led to the loss of livelihoods for fishermen and farmers and the deterioration of public health due to toxic dust and reduced access to clean water.  The impact has been severe for the communities around the lake, but also for migratory birds, which lost important food sources and a critically important stopover point on their journey. Another example is the Sahel, a vast semi-arid region in Africa: Prolonged periods of drought, deforestation, and overgrazing in the Sahel have led to the degradation of the soil and loss of vegetation, threatening the survival of both the local human population and wildlife, including migratory birds. Lake Chad, one of the largest water bodies in Africa in 1960, lost 90 % of its area, depleting water resources for local communities and also for many migratory birds. World Migratory Bird Day serves as an international call to action for the protection of migratory birds, whose ranges often span multiple countries, and are facing many different threats worldwide. The annual campaign is organized by the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), the African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbird Agreement (AEWA), Environment for the Americas (EFTA), and the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP). World Migratory Bird Day 2023 will be officially held on 13 May and 14 October. The two days of World Migratory Bird Day reflect the cyclical nature of bird migration as well as the fact that there are varying peak migration periods in the northern and southern hemispheres. Events to raise awareness of migratory birds and the importance of water will take place all over the world including in local parks, nature centers, museums, libraries, schools, and other locations on these peak days and throughout the year. To learn more about this year’s World Migratory Bird Day campaign and actions to take, visit www.worldmigratorybirdday.org  and EAAFP WMBD 2023 webpage: https://eaaflyway.net/world-migratory-bird-day-2023/ Also, please have a look of the Campaign Strategy for promoting World Migratory Bird Day, click [here]. For more resources, visit the Trello Board [here]. Message from the Partners of World Migratory Bird Day    Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) “Water is essential for people as well as for migratory birds and other wild species of animals. Yet around the world, the availability and quality of water is under enormous pressure, with deeply concerning implications.  The looming global water crisis requires urgent action by governments, businesses, local communities as well as individuals. Because migratory birds cross national borders and even continents, international cooperation is essential to ensure that actions are taken to conserve and restore important habitat for migratory birds, and to address the drivers of water loss, pollution, and climate change,” said Amy Fraenkel, Executive Secretary of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS).     African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbird Agreement (AEWA) “The water crisis recently highlighted by the UN 2023 Water Conference also has a tremendous impact on migratory birds. In the Sahel in particular, many wetlands on which migratory waterbirds rely during the non-breeding period are shrinking. Water is a vital resource for all, local communities as well as birds. By reducing our consumption, combatting climate change, and managing wetlands wiser, we can improve the situation,” said Dr. Jacques Trouvilliez, Executive Secretary of the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA).   Environment for the Americas (EFTA) “World Migratory Bird Day 2023 spotlights the vital role that water plays in the survival of our shared birds. The focal species illustrated on the campaign poster depict the intricate bond each bird shares with water. The diminutive Rufous Hummingbird thrives on nectar-producing flowers that rely on water for their blooms, and the Dickcissel scours the grasslands for seeds that hold the moisture they need. White Pelicans and Ospreys seek their prey in freshwater lakes, while the magnificent Wandering Albatross and Atlantic Puffin remain at sea. WMBD is an opportunity to unify our voices for the conservation of migratory birds and to celebrate their spectacular journeys,” said Dr. Susan Bonfield, Executive Director at Environment for the Americas (EFTA).   East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) “This year's WMBD theme serves as a vital reminder of the linkage of migratory birds to the importance of protecting aquatic ecosystems and conserving wetlands. As birds such as threatened Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Dalmatian Pelican, and Sarus Crane migrate, they rely heavily on wetlands for survival. We must take urgent actions and collaborate at all levels, from citizens to among governments, to tackle the problems of saving water and aquatic ecosystem, and ensure that migratory birds continue to thrive.” Ms. Yeounhee Ahn, Deputy Executive of East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP).  


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  • World Migratory Bird Day 2023

    What is World Migratory Bird Day? The World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) is an annual global awareness-raising campaign to celebrate the amazing journeys of migratory birds, and to inspire worldwide conservation of migratory birds and their habitats. Traditionally observed on the second Saturday of May and October, the two days of World Migratory Bird Day are a way to reflect the cyclical nature of bird migration as well as the fact that there are varying peak migration periods in the northern and southern hemispheres. In 2023, WMBD will be celebrated on 13th May and 14th October. The campaign is a joint effort of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), the African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbird Agreement (AEWA), Environment for the Americas and the EAAFP.  On 17th March, the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) was announced as an official Partner of the World Migratory Bird Day campaign during the 11th Meeting of Partners (MOP11) of the EAAFP held in Brisbane, Australia (link). The new Partnership unites efforts to raise awareness to conserve migratory birds globally. Official website of World Migratory Bird Day: https://www.worldmigratorybirdday.org/ The Theme of World Migratory Bird Day 2023 The theme of World Migratory Bird Day 2023 is “Water: Sustaining Bird Life”.  Water is fundamental to life on our planet. The vast majority of migratory birds rely on aquatic ecosystems during their life cycles. Inland and coastal wetlands, rivers, lakes, streams, marshes, and ponds are all vital for feeding, drinking, or nesting, and also as places to rest and refuel during their long journeys. On the other hand, aquatic ecosystems are becoming increasingly threatened around the world due to increasing human demand for water, integrating with problems of pollution and climate change. This imposes direct impacts on the availability of clean water and migratory birds that depend on them. This year’s World Migratory Bird Day campaign will highlight the importance of water for migratory birds and identify key actions for protecting water resources and aquatic ecosystems. Check the Campaign Strategy for promoting World Migratory Bird Day, click [here]. WMBD 2023 Press release, visit [here]. Learn about the EAA Flyway species featured on the 2023 WMBD poster   Spoon-billed Sandpiper Scientific name: Calidris pygmaea Conservation status: IUCN - Critically Endangered, CMS - Appendix I Spoon-billed Sandpiper is the rarest shorebird and endemic to the East Asian - Australasian Flyway (EAAF). Listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. It is a small shorebird with a peculiar spoon-shaped beak, thus nicknamed as “Spoony”. It breeds in the Arctic region in Russia Far East and winter at coasts in Southeast Asia. It is threatened by habitat loss and degradation, hunting and pollution at the wetlands. https://eaaflyway.net/spoon-billed-sandpiper/     Dalmatian Pelican Scientific name: Pelecanus crispus Conservation status: IUCN - Near Threatened, CMS - Appendix I The Dalmatian Pelican is a large waterbird and the biggest in the Pelican species. It has a big white body and a distinctive beak with an orange or yellowish gular pouch. The bird is a short-to-medium-distance migrant. Its distribution span across Central Eurasia to southern China coast. Hunting, habitat degradation due to wetland alteration and destruction are the main threat it is facing. Photo by Dean (Yu Deng, 邓郁) https://eaaflyway.net/dalmatian-pelican/ Sarus Crane Scientific name: Grus antigone Conservation status: IUCN - Vulnerable, CMS - Appendix II Sarus Crane is a short-distance migrant with a bright red head and upper neck. They are inhabitants in wetlands and agriculture fields. There are populations rangingfrom India and Pakistan, Lower Mekong Basin including Myanmar, Vietnam, Cambodia Thailand, and a Australian population. They are vulnerable due to water diversions and unsustainable conversion of wetlands, habitat loss and other human disturbances. https://savingcranes.org/learn/species-field-guide/sarus-crane/   Join the WMBD Celebration Register your event on the Global Portal https://www.worldmigratorybirdday.org/register-your-event Resources for World Migratory Bird Day 2023 ­EAAFP World Migratory Bird Day 2023 Small Grant The Small Grant for 2023 World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) has been established to provide financial support for EAAFP Partners and collaborators from EAAFP Task Forces and Working Groups, who plan on organizing public events and/or conservation action-oriented workshops at national or local levels for World Migratory Bird Day. We strongly encourage EAAFP Partners and collaborators to make an application for any suitable event or development of WMBD materials in local languages, that aims to raise awareness of the need of conserving migratory waterbirds and the value of their habitats in the East Asian – Australasian Flyway. For details, visit here. Deadline of applying for the WMBD October event: 31st August, 2023. World Migratory Bird Day 2023 Trello Board You can download everything from WMBD 2023 Trello Board [here]. World Migratory Bird Day 2023 Activities Come Fly With Me - 2023 World Migratory Bird Day Webinar with Sacha Dench Date/Time: 12 May, 2023 (Friday), 1500-1600 KST/0600-0700 GMT Meeting Platform: Zoom Language: English Registration: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYocuChqjksGtQp0-YfuilaqDOKW06K5_GM More information, click [here]. You are invited to join the EAAFP Team on 13 May for the Global Big Day by eBird !! Be part of our Team to record migratory waterbirds in #EAAFlyway!  Register an eBird account  Go out and watch birds, keep count of the birds you see  Submit your checklist to eBird and SHARE with "EAAFPTeam"! EAAFPTeam profile: https://ebird.org/profile/MzgyMzk1NA  Benefit: Online version of "Birds of the World" will be FREE ACCESS starting 12th to 15th May!!! Materials for WMBD 2023 2022 WMBD Theme and Posters in EAAF Languages Languages Theme World Migratory Bird Day Poster links English Water: Sustaining Bird Life World Migratory Bird Day  PDF Burmese              ငှက်မျိုးစိတ်များ တည်တံ့ဖို့၊ ရေအရင်းအမြစ်များ ထိန်းသိမ်းစို့ ကမ္ဘာ့ရွှေ့ပြောင်းငှက်နေ့   PDF Bengali জলাশয় সংরক্ষণ নিরাপদ করে পাখির জীবন। বিশ্ব পরিযায়ী পাখি দিবস        PDF Chinese (Simplified) 水:鸟类生命之所系 世界候鸟日        PDF Chinese (Traditional) 水:鳥類生命之所繫 世界候鳥日        PDF Filipino Tubig: Daluyang Búhay ng mga Ibon Pandaigdigang Araw ng mga Ibong Dayo                 PDF Indonesian         Air: Menopang Kehidupan Burung Hari Migrasi Burung Sedunia     PDF Japanese 鳥たちの命を支える水 世界渡り鳥の日  PDF Khmer  ទឹកជួយទ្រទ្រង់ដល់និរន្តរភាពជីវិតសត្វស្លាប ទិវាសត្វស្លាបទេសន្តរប្រវេសន៍ពិភពលោក  PDF Korean (DPRK)   세계철새의 날   Korean (RoK)    물: 새의 삶을 유지하다 세계 철새의 날  PDF Malaysian (Bahasa Malaysia)            Air: Melestarikan Kehidupan Burung Hari Burung Hijrah Sedunia        PDF Mongolian          УС: Шувуудын Амьдралыг Тэтгэe Дэлхийн нүүдлийн шувуудын өдөр  PDF Russian ВОДА: источник жизни птиц  Всемирный день перелётных птиц    PDF Thai         วันนกอพยพโลก               Vietnamese Nước: Duy trì sự sống của các loài chim Ngày chim di cư thế giới             PDF Please contact us if you need raw design files to print or convert for your own local campaign. EAAFP Secretariat E-mail: [email protected] / [email protected]  


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  • World Migratory Bird Day 2023 Global Campaign Poster Unveiled

    We are pleased to present the 2023 World Migratory Bird Day global campaign poster. Featuring the work of Nicaraguan artist Augusto Silva, the poster shows twelve species that help tell the story of the importance of water to migratory birds. The selected bird species remind us that birds and many other species need wetlands for migration, wintering, and breeding. Some birds require specific types of water habitats, such as the tidal flats that Spoon-billed Sandpipers use during migration and winter, the mangrove forests and other coastal areas favored by Black-capped Kingfisher, open water for Dalmatian Pelican and  Maccoa Duck to breed and the seasonally flooded fields in which the Sarus Crane uses. Water is essential for the survival of insects pursued by the Barn Swallow, the growth of nectar-producing plants frequented by the Rufous Hummingbird, and the health of grasslands inhabited by the Dickcissel and riverine forests used by the European Turtle Dove. The Atlantic Puffin and Wandering Albatross represent the oceans that make up 97% of all water on earth and are becoming increasingly polluted with chemicals and plastic waste. And finally, the Osprey serves as a conservation success story, reminding us that bird population declines can be reversed when we work together to conserve and protect our planet. The poster supports the theme of this year’s World Migratory Bird Day, which is “Water: Sustaining Bird Life,” a call of attention to the importance of water and its associated habitats to migratory birds. Unfortunately, increasing human demand for water, as well as human-driven pollution and climate change, threaten many of the water areas on which migratory birds depend. World Migratory Bird Day raises awareness of these issues and serves as a call to action for the protection of birds and their habitats. The two peak days of World Migratory Bird Day 2023 will be 13 May and 14 October, reflecting the cyclical nature of seasonal bird migrations. Events will take place all over the world in parks, nature centers, museums, libraries, schools, and other locations on those two peak days as well as throughout the year. To find an event near you, to register your own event, or to download this year’s campaign poster in multiple languages, go to worldmigratorybirdday.org. The EAAFP Secretariat is calling for support to translate the global poster to your own language, and to share the planned World Migratory Bird Day activities with us. If you require the design file of the poster, or are interested in supporting or involving in World Migratory Bird Day, please contact [email protected].


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  • New Partnership Strengthens Global Campaign for Migratory Birds

    East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) Becomes Official Partner of World Migratory Bird Day Today, the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) was announced as an official Partner of the World Migratory Bird Day campaign during the 11th Meeting of Partners (MOP11) of the EAAFP which was held in Brisbane, Australia. The new Partnership unites efforts to raise awareness to conserve migratory birds globally. World Migratory Bird Day is an annual global awareness-raising campaign to celebrate the amazing journeys of migratory birds, and to inspire worldwide conservation of migratory birds and their habitats. Traditionally observed on the second Saturday of May and October, the two days of World Migratory Bird Day are a way to reflect the cyclical nature of bird migration as well as the fact that there are varying peak migration periods in the northern and southern hemispheres. The campaign is a joint effort of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), the African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbird Agreement (AEWA), Environment for the Americas and the EAAFP. The addition of the EAAFP to this Partnership will strengthen engagement and awareness for migratory birds in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. Ms. Amy Fraenkel, Executive Secretary of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals said “I am confident that the new partnership with EAAFP will open new horizons for global migratory bird conservation and strengthen our common effort to raise awareness of migratory birds and the importance of international cooperation to conserve them.” Dr. Jacques Trouvilliez, AEWA's Executive Secretary said “It is my sincere hope that the signing of this partnership agreement and the good inter-flyway cooperation we have built in the context of World Migratory Bird Day will continue to grow. It is the spirit of flyway conservation and the recognition that international cooperation is essential to conserve migratory birds that unite us and helps carry our message across the world.” Dr. Susan Bonfield, Executive Director of Environment for the Americas highlighted “Birds do not recognize the presence of political borders. With this partnership agreement, we express our unwavering dedication to safeguarding migratory birds throughout their flyways and promoting the connections between people and birds on the occasion of World Migratory Bird Day. Together, our organizations pledge to collaborate towards the global conservation of migratory birds.” Mr. Robb Kaler, Chair of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership said “We are thrilled to join as a new Partner to World Migratory Bird Day and to collaborate with CMS, AEWA and EFTA! The new partnership will allow stronger collaboration, inspire more great ideas and make a wider impact on the conservation of migratory birds on a global level. The EAAFP is committed to voice out the message to conserve migratory birds together.” Speech by Mr. Robb Kaler, Chair of EAAFP to announce the WMBD Partnership during EAAFP MOP11.  ©EAAFP Secretariat The theme of World Migratory Bird Day in 2023 is “Water: Sustaining Bird Life” and will be used to highlight the importance of water for migratory birds. Inland and coastal wetlands, rivers, lakes, streams, marshes, and ponds are all vital for feeding, drinking, or nesting, and also as places to rest and refuel during their long journeys. Unfortunately, many of these water bodies and aquatic ecosystems are becoming increasingly threatened around the world and so are the migratory birds that depend on them. The two peak days of World Migratory Bird Day 2023 will be 13 May and 14 October, reflecting the cyclical nature of bird migration with varying migration periods in the northern and southern hemispheres. Learn more about World Migratory Bird Day www.migratorybirdday.org Other Press releases: CMS: https://www.cms.int/en/news/new-partnership-strengthens-global-campaign-migratory-birds-0 Environews Nigeria: https://www.environewsnigeria.com/new-partnership-strengthens-global-campaign-for-migratory-birds/


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  • Celebration of World Migratory Bird Day 2022 in Australia: Stories of Home

    In the 2022 WMBD October event, Australian Artist Kate Gorringe-Smith organised an interactive exhibition “Stories of Home” at the Joel Gallery, Louis Joel Arts and Community Centre. In the…


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  • Welcoming the migratory bird for the first time at Paleik Lake in Mandalay region, central Myanmar

    On 1 October 2022, Biodiversity And Nature Conservation Association collaborated with the Shwe Kantharyar Nature Conservation Association, a community- based organization in Pyu Lake, and celebrated the first time…


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