• EAAFP welcomes new Communication Officer: Wen Qing Ng

    © Wen Qing Ng The East-Asian Australasian Flyway Partnership welcomes a dynamic addition as Wen Qing Ng joins the Secretariat as the Communication Officer, infusing a new dimension into the arena. With a profound interest in wildlife conservation and biosecurity projects, her unique perspective and diverse background spanning over a decade promise to breathe fresh energy into the field. Originating from Malaysia, Wen Qing brings a unique perspective shaped by the rich cultural diversity of her homeland. Her firsthand understanding of the challenges involved in fostering environmental responsibility within varied populations has ignited her passion for effective communication. This journey led her to pursue a postgraduate degree in Science Communication at the New Zealand's University of Otago. Here, she cultivated skills in multimedia storytelling, skillfully blending the realms of art and science. Her proactive involvement in an international research unit further underscored her ability to communicate complex concepts through a variety of media. © Wen Qing Ng A notable highlight in Wen Qing's career is the creation of the documentary "Kauri K9s." This compelling production sheds light on training sniffer dogs to combat kauri dieback, a critical threat to New Zealand's conifer species. The success of this endeavor showcases her prowess in weaving scientific information with engaging narratives drawn from local communities. However, Wen Qing's communication prowess extend beyond the surface. She recognizes that effective communication involves not only aesthetics but also addressing the fundamental "why" and reaching the right audience. Her experiences collaborating with avian experts and enthusiasts within international organizations during her undergraduate years have honed her strategic communication skills, setting her apart as a versatile communicator. Amid the unprecedented challenges posed by the pandemic, Wen Qing's adeptness in planning and execution shone brightly. By the close of 2022, she successfully completed her Master of Science Communication, specializing in Science and Natural History Filmmaking, demonstrating her resilience and commitment to her pursuits. In her role as Communications Officer, Wen Qing is poised to champion the causes of biodiversity and community well-being through innovative communication strategies. Her vision extends beyond mere metrics, understanding that true impact is measured by tangible progress. With her on board, the science communication landscape gains a dedicated advocate for wildlife conservation and biosecurity, with a unique blend of creativity and strategic thinking. As we extend our warmest welcome to Wen Qing Ng, we eagerly anticipate the positive influence she will bring to our shared endeavors.


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  • Saying Goodbye to Ms. Vivian Fu, Senior Communication Officer of EAAFP Secretariat

    With a mix of fond memories and deep appreciation, the EAAFP Secretariat is preparing to say goodbye to Vivian Fu, their esteemed Senior Communication Officer. Over the past five years, Vivian has wholeheartedly dedicated herself to the mission of protecting migratory waterbirds and their habitats in East Asian-Australasian Flyway. As she moves on from her position, it is important to reflect on the incredible achievements she has made during her time with the Secretariat. In this special interview, we explore the meaningful experiences and valuable insights that have shaped Vivian's journey within the Secretariat. From her humble beginnings to her most cherished projects, this article offers a glimpse into the person behind the role and the significant impact she has had on the EAAFP. Join us as we celebrate Vivian's determined spirit, her impressive accomplishments, and the enduring legacy she leaves behind at the Secretariat as she embarks on a new professional chapter. Question: Hi Vivian, you have been with the EAAFP Secretariat for about 5 years, but now you are leaving, how do you feel? Answer: It's a bit of a mixed bag for me because I've been here for nearly five years, gaining loads of valuable experience. I've built up some great connections and friendships in Korea and within and beyond the Flyway, so it's sad to say goodbye to our Partners, collaborators, local friends, and all. The Secretariat also granted me invaluable experiences in different perspectives, meeting and reaching out to many people. I was always impressed by the passion of people, and it was an amazing time working with them. Yet, I am sure that these friendships and experiences will be continued as I will work in the conservation field, and that we will meet again or work together at some point in the future! But, at the same time, the more I worked, the more I realized there are still a lot of things I don’t know and lacked skill and knowledge. So, it's time for me to shake things up, try something different, and embrace new opportunities to learn and grow. Question: Going back to the beginning, what made you have an interest in migratory birds and conservation works? Answer: I think my love for animals started when I was little. As a kid, I used to go hiking with my family and watch documentaries about animals, which really sparked my interest. When I got to university, I chose to study ecology at the University of Hong Kong because it was the only subject that allowed me to focus on terrestrial ecology, which I was fascinated by. When I was young, I had this simple dream of saving the Giant Panda because they are cute. I also need to thank my teacher, Dr. Billy Hou, for organizing activities outside of class, where my classmates and I got to explore various things like bird watching, plants, amphibians, reptiles, butterflies—you name it. The wonders of the natural world truly amazed me. I came to understand that while the Giant Panda had plenty of people looking out for them, other animals like birds, amphibians, reptiles, butterflies, and plants received relatively less awareness and needed conservation attention too. That's why I shifted my focus to working on different animals. I actually started my career studying amphibians and then moved on to birds. It felt like a meaningful way for me to engage and contribute to the world of conservation. Even in urban areas like Hong Kong, I can still find animals, birds, and amphibians surviving in small pockets of natural habitat. I'm always amazed when I step outside my home on rainy days and hear the calls of frogs, knowing they're surviving underneath the concrete-paved roads. It just goes to show that no matter where you are, there's always something you can do to help protect nature. With my background in ecology from university and my expertise as an ecologist, I truly grasp the importance of habitats and the environment for the well-being of the animals I love. These growing interests in conservation work have become an integral part of who I am. It's a common trajectory—getting to know these animals, falling in love with them, and feeling a deep desire to protect and conserve them. Question: Then, what brought you to the EAAFP Secretariat and what was your motivation? Answer: Well, I've actually been tagging along with the conservation of birds for a while now. I spent a good 8 years working on bird conservation before joining EAAFP. Back then, I was involved in a joint programme on bird conservation in China, working alongside the Hong Kong Bird Watching Society and BirdLife International. There were projects to conserve endangered bird species such as Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Chinese Crested Tern, Yellow-breasted Bunting, etc, and all the time working with local communities. Over the years I realized how crucial it is to engage people and convince them to support conservation efforts. That's why I believe in the significance of CEPA (Communication/Capacity Building, Education, Participation, and Awareness) work, that it should be merged at every levels, even though its impact may take some time to show. So, when I heard about the position of Communication Officer at EAAFP and the work will be focusing on CEPA, I felt this might be where I could explore and devote more energy to messaging the importance of the conservation of birds and bringing people to work together. I saw the need for more effort in CEPA in conservation, and I wanted to learn and dive headfirst into that realm of work. That's what keeps me motivated. Question: I think CEPA activities would be possible in other countries, would working in EAAFP make any difference? Answer: Actually, what I'm really excited about is EAAFP itself. It's on a whole other level compared to my previous focus on just one country or region. With EAAFP, we're talking about a Flyway scope, where things operate on a much grander scale as well as the impact is wider. Working here gives me international experience and allows me to see things with a wider vision, and I could work with the government, leading conservationists, scientists, and people with different backgrounds. It allows me to understand more about the systems and mindsets of government, IGOs, and international and local NGOs. I found that many times that people are interested and willing to support conservation actions when they understand the needs, it is then our role to find out ways for them to facilitate, and keep encouraging. Question: I believe the Communication Officer and Communication Team are doing a lot for CEPA activities. What are the most interesting/memorable CEPA activities you have worked on so far? Answer: That’s a difficult question, too many memorable activities, such as organizing MOP10 and MOP11! One thing I am thankful to the Secretariat is the freedom to explore things. I enjoy exploring different avenues and reaching out to new collaborators. One particular project that stands out of my mind at the moment is the Flyway Youth Forum. It all began in 2020, right around the time when COVID started. This experience really showcased how strong the partnership of EAAFP was and how far a collaborative action can bring us. As the work plan adopted in MOP10, we need to organize a youth forum, so I started reaching out to people for ideas. Chris Rostron from WWT introduced me to Youth Engage in Wetlands (YEW) from the Ramsar Convention, and later on the concept of the first-ever Flyway Youth Forum was developed. There were lots of challenges, especially during the Pandemic period and we got to adapt to new technologies. But, oh boy, there were quite a few challenges along the way. The pandemic made everything even more difficult, especially as we had to adapt to the online environment and learn about online technology. But after 6 months to prepare for the two-weekend activities, the outcomes of the Flyway Youth Forum were great and exceeded our expectations. We had over 130 participants and more than 80 young leaders, with many of our Partners and collaborators supporting and participating. We drew inspiration from the energy of the young people and their passion for doing things at a high standard, and we heard their desire to engage more in conservation and need for capacity building. After the Flyway Youth Forum, we learned that East-Atlantic Flyway Youth Forum was established too. Now, we're even dreaming of a joint Flyway Youth Forum encompassing the entire world's flyways. It's still a dream, but it's great that we've initiated this conversation. Following the Flyway Youth Forum, we launched the Youth Think Tank Competition, which led to more conservation actions by youth. And wonderful things were these endeavors continued to foster discussions with our Partners, culminating in the development of a decision paper “Youth Mainstreaming in Flyway”, including establishing a Youth Task Force. All of these experiences have been incredibly valuable for me. It has been an exciting journey for me to witness within EAAFP, that the immense energy and strong bonds we can forge with our Partners while empowering one another along the way. Question: Reversely, throughout your work, what big challenges do you have in the role of Communication Officer and what lessons did these challenges teach you? Answer: One of the challenges I often face is having so many things I want to accomplish with my colleagues and Partners, but also recognizing the limited capacity of myself and the secretariat as well. However, despite the challenges, we have managed to navigate through the past few years, and luckily we have wonderful Partners to support. I've come to realize that even though our capacity may be limited at difficult times, it's crucial to learn to reach out for help. When we make that call, people are responsive and extend their helping hands. This spirit of collaboration and support is an essential aspect of EAAFP, that we are built on partnerships, understanding that no single country or organization can accomplish everything alone. Cooperation is key. And we work collectively towards achieving our common mission and vision: to conserve migratory waterbirds in our Flyway. Question: Let’s move to your life in Korea. Ever since you came to Korea, what were your most impressive experiences in Korea? Answer: I can't pinpoint a single experience that stands out. However, collectively, the friendships I have formed during my time in Korea, either at work or outside the office, are incredibly valuable to me. During my work at the Secretariat, we often have meetings with people. When we meet face to face, I feel a genuine connection, we shared common interests, particularly in bird conservation. It's during these interactions that we discuss challenges, dreams, and aspirations, that we offer support to one another, fostering a sense of camaraderie. As a birdwatcher, of course, an enjoyment was birdwatching in Korea. I love exploring various bird-watching sites in Korea, and seeing birds that would pass through my hometown in Hong Kong gave me a stronger feeling that we are all connected in the flyway. Being at the site allows me to learn the reality at the site level as well. It's amazing how I came across people who share the same passion for birdwatching, and from there, we become friends and embark on bird-watching adventures together. The joy of sharing bird information and going on these excursions is truly priceless. Question: Since you are leaving, what is your hope for the EAAFP and the Secretariat? Answer: In a conceptual sense, what I truly value is fostering strong bonds and connectivity among people. It's a strength that I believe lies within EAAFP. Maintaining this unique connection among Partners and different sectors is incredibly important. During the MOPs, I witness the government officials engaging in friendly conversations and laughter with representatives from other organizations, scientists, and site managers. This kind of atmosphere is something worth preserving and enhancing. Furthermore, I hope to see an active and expanding network of flourishing sites within EAAFP, and there will be more active Flyway Network Sites, and Sister Sites to be established.  Additionally, I aspire to see more young people actively participating in EAAFP in the future. I believe all these are achievable goals. Question: Lastly, do you have any messages to your colleagues? Answer: There are two types of acknowledgment, Firstly, for my colleagues at the Secretariat, I am truly grateful for all my colleagues, not only the staff but also our interns who have made my time in Korea truly wonderful. They meant so much to me for we had gone through ups and downs together. Over the past four years, despite being a foreigner and sometimes the only foreigner in the office, I have never felt discriminated against. They have made me feel at home here, taken good care of me as well as invited and shared information about fun activities, sometimes even family gatherings and events. I couldn’t thank them more. The teamwork I experienced in the office is exceptional and our colleagues are professional. I have learned so much from them. Our lovely interns bring a joyful spirit, they are always helpful and I genuinely enjoy spending time with them. I would encourage my colleagues, despite that we all have our limitations, if you have a passion or a dream to try something, you can pursue it and help will come along with the will. Moving on to colleagues of our Partners, Working Groups & Task Forces, and other collaborators, they are all amazing individuals. My gratitude for all their support and for answering our call for help all the time. Working with them has been an enjoyable experience. They are all remarkable people with big hearts and lofty dreams in conservation. Being alongside them, I feel a sense of empowerment, knowing that we can make a difference together. I believe that we will meet again in the future! I am sure they would extend their support to the new staff at the Secretariat. The Secretariat created a message board for Vivian. If you have any message for her, please leave it here: https://www.kudoboard.com/boards/6aZiqawx        


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  • EAAFP welcomes new Programme Officer: Kyle Esperanza Zuleta

    @ Kyle Esperanza Zuleta The East-Asian Australasian Flyway Partnership is thrilled to welcome Kyle Esperanza Zuleta as its newly appointed Programme Officer. With an impressive background in environmental science and a decade of experience in national and regional cooperation focused on biodiversity and nature conservation, Kyle brings a wealth of expertise to the organization. Her extensive involvement in projects related to wetlands, migratory waterbirds, and coastal and marine environments makes her a valuable addition to the team. During her previous tenure as a Programme Officer at the ACB, Kyle has been instrumental in supporting ASEAN Member States in strengthening regional cooperation for the conservation of wetlands and migratory waterbirds through the ASEAN Flyway Network. She has played a vital role in the development and implementation of various ASEAN cooperation projects. Kyle's exceptional organizational skills and meticulous attention to detail have been key to their successful execution. Kyle's passion for conservation is evident. She has coordinated and facilitated efforts to improve biodiversity conservation within the ASEAN region. Moreover, her collaboration with ASEAN Member States has been vital in coastal and marine-related projects, fostering partnerships, and ensuring the successful implementation of recommended conservation actions. She has also actively participated in international meetings and engagements, including the Thirteenth Meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals and our Eleventh Meeting of Partners. These engagements have broadened her perspective and allowed her to bring global best practices and insights to her work. With her extensive project development skills, Kyle contributes valuable expertise to the EAAFP.  She has been involved in the formulation of policy guidelines and frameworks on biodiversity at different levels, including global, regional, national, and subnational. Her ability to consolidate relevant information and develop concept papers and project proposals has been crucial in supporting EAAFP’s mandate including meeting the needs of ASEAN Member States who are our valued Partners. Besides holding a bachelor’s degree in biology with a concentration in Environmental Science, she has also pursued various training programs to enhance her skills and knowledge. These include courses in GIS, results-based monitoring, and evaluation, as well as pollution control. Her appointment as Programme Officer at the EAAFP is an opportunity to continue to grow and she will undoubtedly contribute to the continued success of the EAAFP's initiatives. Her experiences have made her well-equipped to communicate and work effectively with a variety of stakeholders. The EAAFP eagerly looks forward to the positive impact Kyle will make as she takes on her new role and continues to champion the cause of the protection of migratory waterbirds and their habitats.


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  • Farewell Interview with Hyeseon Do, Senior Programme Officer of EAAFP Secretariat

    “I have truly fallen in love”: Hyeseon Reflects on Her Years of Experience at the EAAFP @EAAFP Secretariat Introduction Hyeseon Do recently departed from her role as Senior Programme Officer at EAAFP Secretariat. Hyeseon has been an integral part of the organization for the past six years, dedicating her time and expertise to furthering the mission of the EAAFP. As part of her farewell, this interview gave her an opportunity to share her unique perspective and insights gained during her extensive tenure with the EAAFP. As she bids farewell to her colleagues and moves on to new endeavors, we recognize the invaluable contributions she has made to the EAAFP's work in promoting the conservation of migratory waterbirds and their habitats along the East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF). It also serves as a moment to celebrate her achievements and acknowledge the impact she has had on the organization's initiatives. Her dedication, professionalism, and passion for environmental conservation have been evident throughout her time with the EAAFP. We extend our best wishes to Hyeseon as she embarks on new endeavors, confident that her knowledge and experience will continue to drive positive change in the field of conservation. We are grateful that she has reflected on her journey, and shared her valuable insights to hopefully inspire others to take up the cause of protecting our precious waterbirds, their homes, and the livelihoods of those who depend on them. @EAAFP Secretariat Question: What was the motivation that brought you to the EAAFP Secretariat? Hyeseon: I started working at the EAAFP Secretariat as a Programme and Communication intern almost 10 years ago. I think that's how I started my life together with the EAAFP. My motivation came certainly from the people I had met, their inspiration, and migratory waterbirds (It was the first in my life to see through a scope! Like other most interns here.) during that internship period. That was amazing, to meet many conserving needs, our Partners and then the staff members who have been really motivated by Nature and a joint goal. I've never met such passionate people about their work and then for something most people probably don't focus on. So that was certainly a trigger for me to learn and then a rechanneling of my career and life path. Before I re-joined the Secretariat, I majored in international law in China and then I worked for the NGOs, a UN agency, an embassy, and then a law firm. My background is very diverse, and I was still very ambitious and hesitant to pick the best one I could pursue for the rest of my life based on my knowledge and experience and full of curiosities  But as soon as I really met the devoted people here, I found that probably this is the kind of destiny that would make me work a lot meaningfully (or workaholic!) with a strong justification. Question: You mentioned that you were an intern at the EAAFP Secretariat 10 years ago. Do you see any parallels between your experience as an intern and your experience that came afterward as a Programme Officer? Do you think your experience helped you? Hyeseon: Yes indeed. The experience I had before being a Programme Officer having already had almost 15 years of experience in diverse environments including the school life in China had a great impact. The unique thing or character I probably would’ve brought to the Secretariat and to the Partnership was a little bit of a different sense of having work experience in a different way from the conservation field. So, I tried to bring the knowledge e.g. formulating a capacity building program and training internally and with the externals (including youth, and governments), diplomatic skills, strategic coordination skills, and administration management skills. All these experiences certainly helped a lot to shape my work stream, and workstyle and to make the Secretariat system settle in more effectively and efficiently. @EAAFP Secretariat Question: What big challenges did you face in your role as Programme Officer and what lessons did these challenges teach you? Hyeseon: Yes, the biggest challenge was I was not a keen birdwatcher, I didn’t know the names, and still the most difficult part! I've been thinking about this question a lot and of course, there are so many things beyond the specific challenges at work I have faced. But if I had to not consider only my challenges here but what the EAAFP is facing collectively it still would be the challenge of how to convince a wider group of people, how to strategically tell our story and mission to the people so that they are emotionally invested and being a supporter. We deal with a variety of stakeholders so effective storytelling taking that into account, to prompt their thoughts about the importance of biodiversity conservation or the importance of the migratory waterbird habitat was the biggest challenge. To address this, with the collaboration with my team and colleagues, I've been very focused on how our EAAFP can be branded globally and domestically and then how we can tell a compelling appealing story to anyone not only for our Partners, but for diplomats, mayors, private sectors, media, site managers, civil societies, and general public. So, I made a storyboard myself that targets different groups of people and considers what I need to tell this group or the other group in their languages. I trusted the person motivated will whisper our stories to their family, friends, and colleagues. @EAAFP Secretariat Question: Thank you for your answers. What is your message to your colleagues? Hyeseon: A message your work is contributing even though you can’t see the result right away and makes your work and time meaningful! One day the scattered dots will all be connected. Our work is invisible sometimes and then people also don't know. So, we personally need to be truly motivated, and we must be goal-oriented otherwise we can’t tell the real message we wanted. If we are not convinced by nature or by our mission our story that we cannot convince others.  I highly recommend that everyone really tries to have that mindset and for everyone to really chase opportunities and hope for all of us. It’s been almost 10 years journeying with EAAFP Secretariat and still many former interns and colleagues said EAAFP Secretariat has a unique and amazing atmosphere which can’t be found in other organizations and miss about. We were special and will be! Please continue and then remember the precious moments you have in love and how we formed synergy together. That is all that’s needed. That’s my feeling and it's continued even now. @EAAFP Secretariat Question: I think working here it seems that you really have hopes for us and hopes for us to continue and for the entire organization as an entity not necessarily just as staff. What do you hope for? What is your hope for the EAAFP and the Secretariat? Hyeseon: There's a big hope! As everyone knows, the Partnership is growing and expanding, and it means that now there is greater awareness of how crucial nature is for all people. These days the biodiversity agenda is really on top of everything globally, especially when we talk about climate change. We shouldn’t miss this timing, we need to collaborate and cooperate more to synergize it and then make our agenda up front at site, regional and national levels (wherever you are and whatever you can) more than any agenda. Just emphasize that the nature and migratory waterbirds that surround you are there and that we really need to protect together (and that's the aim of our Flyway Partnership) as an indicator of the climate crisis and that we have been not just only working with the government Partner, but we work with other diverse Partners and collaborators, including the ground site level as well. The Partnership story is real, and we are not selfishly fighting for ourselves, for all of us including your family. That is my hope. Question: All right so now we're going to ask some personal questions only for you. Working at the EAAFP you might already have a lot of memorable moments, but can you share with us one of your most memorable moments you had while working at the EAAFP? Hyeseon: That's difficult to pick one of the memorable moments. Of course, I was really pleased to meet all of the Partners and supporters at the 11th Meeting of Partners in Brisbane early this year, we’ve collectively made many important decisions, danced, sang, laughed, and hugged - and were happy about being gathered again after the COVID pandemic. Another memorable moment I can think of - like for example EAAFP was part of the World Natural Heritage Site nomination for the Yellow Sea tidal flats (important habitats for migratory waterbirds) and because of that, I visited the different sites in Yellow Sea, and I met lots of the stakeholders including from countries, local government, experts and local communities, to understand the issues, conflicts, impacts, and concerns. I was just very honored to be a part of the journey of making the inscription happen eventually. The momentum that the Partnership really made is to see the support from the UNESCO member countries to agree to announce to the world that they encourage to protect these identified habitats for the Heritage in the Flyway as a top priority at the UNESCO committee meeting.  At the moment, I also couldn’t stop crying and smiling as I knew how our Partners desperately wanted to protect these areas. My dream came true partially. I was really honored to be the presenter on behalf of the EAAFP to say that we are really pleased about the commitment and hope that following this example, other countries can step up together to really protect these habitats in every way they can for our Flyway and their Flyway. Subsequent follow-up measures and conversations are continuing until now. People talk more about Flyway everywhere. @EAAFP Secretariat Question So the job that you had, you got to the rank of Senior Programme Officer because you've been here a long time. When you're in a position for a long time sometimes your motivation can ebb and flow. Sometimes you're really motivated and sometimes the work seems difficult. How did you personally maintain your motivation to keep going with the job? Hyeseon: To be honest I think of course there were moments that I was discouraged, for example, if somebody isn’t committed after we put a lot of effort change their mind. In those moments I tried to meet the local people or visit the site because in any case, our ultimate goal is to give a benefit to their livelihood at the local level.  As I was very new to the conservation field and flyway work when I joined the Secretariat, I had to put triple the effort than others to understand the dynamic and identify real impact at the local level and on Partnership. I didn’t want to ruin what people had built on, so didn’t mind approaching any people who will help me to have up-close lessons and experiences. Our Partners and supporters were always approachable and answered very patiently and kindly whenever I inquired (even though those are very easy ones). Looking back, my energy and motivation were from the people the most including our team members, colleagues, and flyway friends.  Of course, sometimes I go bird watching or do local activities as well to really feel what we are doing the work for. Namdong Reservoir (located in Incheon, surrounded by industrial zones and an urban reclaimed city), Black-faced Spoonbill breeding habitat, was one of my favorite places I can breathe and seek a solution when I felt stuck.   Question: I see. So, you're leaving very soon. What is your plan after leaving the Secretariat? Anything you're particularly excited about? Hyeseon: Sorry - I'm so excited about all! I definitely have mixed feelings as I leave you and all. Even though I won’t be a part of the Secretariat, the memory I really have had here with all of you is so memorable that I think whatever I do, I think that I will be trying to find a way to re-contribute the work of the Flyway.  In the long term, my plan is to continue working in the conservation field and find ways to contribute in different ways. I want to join volunteering activities as a tour guide/site manager/educator/interpreter/birdwatcher at sites to understand the challenges and needs of local people and travel the natural sites around the world.  Additionally, I'm interested in corporate engagement and how to incorporate the biodiversity agenda into their environmental, social, and governance (ESG) actions and strategies. So, I am taking a self-sabbatical with my new binoculars – I will be around, so don‘t be surprised if I show up in your country and event. Question: We now have a great idea as to what your experience has been here. But if you could sum up your feelings as you're leaving into one word or one phrase, what would it be? Hyeseon: Currently, I find it difficult to express my emotions precisely. However, I must admit that I no longer feel sadness because I have come to realize that no matter where I go, I will always be a part of the conservation work. This realization brings me a sense of gratitude and blessing, especially considering the remarkable individuals I have had the privilege of meeting and working with across the globe. Witnessing the shared passion and dedication of hundreds of people is a sight I had never before encountered. EAAFP was a truly special atmosphere and one that we should strive to preserve. Through these encounters, I have forged connections and friendships that span the entire world. This realization not only fills me with a deep sense of gratitude but also ignites an ever-growing love for the work we do and the mission we pursue. In all honesty, I believe I have truly fallen in love with the field of conservation. @EAAFP Secretariat The Secretariat created a message board for Hyeseon. If you have any message to her, please leave it here: https://www.kudoboard.com/boards/GbD0L90E


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  • Farewell to Yeonah Ku, External Relations Specialist of EAAFP Secretariat

    11th Meeting of Partners (2023) © EAAFP Secretariat Over the past three years, from June 2020 to May 2023, I had the privilege of working at the EAAFP Secretariat, making meaningful contributions to various projects. As a Local Project Coordinator (Jun 2020 – Jan 2023) and External Relations Specialist (Feb – May 2023). From my early experiences to my recent endeavors, I have dedicated myself to the field of conservation and sustainable development. Beginning with my study background in biology and ecology, I have pursued my passion for protecting our natural world and promoting sustainable practices. This passion took root during my junior year of university in 2009 when I first delved into the realm of wetlands and waterbirds, gaining a deeper understanding of the Ramsar Convention and the East Asian – Australasian Flyway. Building upon this foundation, I joined the EAAFP Secretariat in 2018 as a Communication Specialist for six months (Article), where I further developed my abilities in effectively conveying the importance of conservation efforts. I have immersed myself in various projects within the realm of sustainable development, conservation, and energy plan policy. During my tenure as the Local Project Coordinator, I spearheaded two crucial projects in the RO Korea: the "Collaboration on Conservation of the Hwaseong Wetlands" (2020 – 2022) and the "Incheon-Hong Kong Conservation Project on Migratory Waterbirds and their Habitats" (2022 – 2023). International Symposium for the Hwaseong Wetlands (2021) © EAAFP Secretariat A Discussion for Sustainable Development of the Hwaseong Wetlands (2022) © KFEM Hwaseong The "Collaboration on Conservation of the Hwaseong Wetlands" encompassed a range of activities, including international symposia, communication with local stakeholders, ecological surveys, training programs for locals, public awareness events, and the formulation of management strategies. Notably, I played a significant role in crafting proposals and reports such as “Wise Use of the Hwaseong Wetlands Flyway Network Site: 2020 Final Report”, “The Proposal for the Management Directions for the Sustainable use of the Hwaseong Wetlands”, and “A Vision for the Hwaseong Wetlands”. See the overview article: Activities of the EAAFP Secretariat for Hwaseong Wetlands Conservation Projects 2020-2022 (link) the 3rd Incheon-Hong Kong International East Asian-Australasian Black-faced Spoonbill Conservation Cooperation Forum (2023) © EAAFP Secretariat The "Incheon-Hong Kong Conservation Project on Migratory Waterbirds and their Habitats" focused on waterbird surveys, Black-faced Spoonbill census, communication and education efforts, and organizing international forums. Through this project, we achieved remarkable milestones, including record-breaking Black-faced Spoonbill populations, strengthened collaborations between Incheon and Hong Kong, and the launch of educational initiatives. These accomplishments are showcased through various articles, reports, and videos that highlight the significance of our conservation efforts. 2020 Black-faced Spoonbill Census Results showed Black-faced Spoonbills population hits record high (link) 1st forum: Incheon-Hong Kong International East Asian – Australasian Flyway Black-faced Spoonbill Conservation Cooperation Forum (link) 2nd forum: Stronger working relationship between Incheon and Hong Kong to conserve Black-faced Spoonbill (link) 3rd forum: Move forward for Black-faced Spoonbill Conservation in EAAF (link) A Tale of Black-faced Spoonbill Linking Two Cities – Launch of Incheon-Hong Kong Sister Site Agreement video (link) World Migratory Bird Day: WWF collaborates with EAAPF to Launch an Updated Education Pack “Lolo Flying Journey” about Black-faced Spoonbill (link) Linking environmental educators from Hong Kong and Incheon for conservation of migratory waterbirds (link) Report of monitoring of migratory waterbirds 2021 – 2022 at the Songdo Tidal Flat Flyway Network Site in Ro Korea (link)   I am immensely grateful for the collaborative spirit demonstrated by diverse sectors within and beyond the EAAFP. It was through our combined efforts that we achieved these remarkable outcomes. Additionally, I had the privilege of supporting communication with Korean governments and civil societies on various conservation matters, drawing upon my network and experience. Conservation of migratory birds and their habitats along the Han River Estuary, Ro Korea (link) At the Nakdong Estuary FNS, river flowing freely for the first time in 35 years (link) Special Exhibition on Shorebirds of Nakdong Estuary, Ro Korea (link) First Upo Wetland Symposium held to promote harmony between birds and people (link) Confirmation of important sites for Scaly-sided Merganser in Ro Korea (link) Scaly-Sided Merganser- Workshop in Suncheon (external link from HSS) Conference on Management of Flyways in Asia (link) EAAFP Secretariat visited Partner and Flyway Network Site in New Zealand (link)   As the External Relations Specialist, I also played an essential role in managing sponsorships and corporate engagement for the 11th Meeting of Partners (MOP11) and other external relations projects. Our endeavors fostered fruitful partnerships and showcased the profound impact of collaboration between humans and nature. MOP11 sponsor page (link) Corporate engagement page (link) EAAFP leads happy companionship of humans and nature through the Ulsan Symposium for Migratory Birds (link) Looking back on my time at the EAAFP Secretariat, I am proud of the accomplishments we achieved together. My journey here has solidified my passion for wetlands and waterbirds, which first ignited during my junior year of university when I discovered the Ramsar Convention and the East Asian – Australasian Flyway. As I transition from this role and embark on new opportunities, I am eager to continue making a meaningful impact in the conservation and sustainable development realm. If you would like to connect with me or discuss potential collaborations, please feel free to reach out to me at [[email protected]]. Thank you for being a part of this incredible journey, and let's continue our collective efforts in safeguarding our precious natural heritage. Warm regards, Yeonah Ku  


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  • Communication Officer Recruitment (closed)

    Communication Officer Recruitment Communication Officer Recruitment at the East Asian–Australasian Flyway Partnership Secretariat   The East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) is a flyway-wide framework which aims to conserve migratory waterbirds, their habitats, and the livelihoods of people dependent upon them in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. The EAAFP Secretariat based in Incheon, Republic of Korea is to support its 40 Partners, expertise and a range of stakeholders in the Partnership. The Communication Officer is expected to work in the Secretariat to coordinate,  facilitate and promote the implementation of EAAFP’s CEPA (Communication/Capacity Building, Education, Participation and Awareness) Action Plan, and to facilitate the implementation of EAAFP’s Strategic Plan with Partners, NGOs, local communities and other teams in the Secretariat, and work closely with CEPA Working Group. The position will take care of daily communications and publications of the Secretariat. Strong communication skills and working experience with government, intergovernmental organizations, and international NGOs and knowledge on conservation issues in the region is desirable. The Communication Officer reports to the Chief Executive. A statement of duties and responsibilities can be found below: Communication Officer Term of Reference   JOB DESCRIPTION: Location: EAAFP Secretariat, Incheon, Republic of Korea Department: Communication Team, EAAFP Secretariat Reporting to: Chief Executive Type of contract: Full-Time Permanent Position (1 year-based renewal) Work hours: 09:30 – 18:30, Monday – Friday Benefits: 20 days annual leave per year (not inclusive of the 15 days Korean national holidays), Social Insurance Premiums (National Pension Contribution will be paid monthly and borne half between the employee and the employer), the Retirement fund will be provided following the relevant laws of the Republic of Korea. Application Submission Deadline: 20 June 2023, Sunday 18:00 Korean Time Required application documents: EAAFP Job Application Form, Cover Letter, CV, Reference Letters (Optional) Interview: Late-June 2023 Expected starting date: Early-July, 2023 (Negotiable) Applicants for this position should submit the Application Form (including the names, email addresses and contact phone numbers of three references),  Cover Letter, CV, and Reference Letters (optional) Application (resume plus attachment) should be sent by email to [email protected] by 6:00 pm (Korea time), 20 June 2023, 2023.      


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  • EAAFP welcomes Ms. Jennifer George as New Chief Executive

    The East Asian-Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) is delighted to announce the appointment of Ms. Jennifer George from New Zealand, as its new Chief Executive of the Secretariat, effective on 20th June 2023. With a distinguished career in various sectors, and being a lawyer in practice, Ms. George brings a wealth of experience and a passion for driving positive change to her role in leading the EAAFP’s mission of conserving migratory waterbirds and their habitats along the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. Her recent remarkable contributions extend to her role as an EAAFP consultant for developing the recently adopted MOP11 Decision Papers namely “Guidelines for EAAFP National and Site Partnerships” and  “’ Guidelines for the EAAFP Sister Site Program”. Many of you might have discussed with her during the consultation period of the Guidelines and met her at MOP11 this March, in Brisbane, Australia. Her expertise and collaboration with the EAAFP Secretariat and Partners have resulted in driving momentum to the development of the partnership. She is also an active member of the EAAFP Partner, Pukorokoro Miranda Naturalists Trust, where her interest and passion for conserving migratory waterbirds has built up. Ms. George has an extensive background as a performance-driven professional that spans government, law, education, business development, and the non-profit sector. She worked in the Secretariat of the Climate Change Chief Executives Board of the Ministry for the Environment, New Zealand, to provide advice on best practice governance, and lessons learned from similar arrangements, mentor analysts, and improve governance systems and processes. She has years of experience in governance and served in the governmental sector for the New Zealand Qualifications Authority, Ministry of Justice, Wellington City Council, New Zealand. Her roles ranged from analyst and project manager to convenor of an expert panel. As a governance consultant, Jennifer has been instrumental in developing best-practice governance frameworks for Crown Entity and local governments, ensuring compliance with legislative requirements, and fostering efficient processes. Her research and advocacy have resulted in policy changes at the governmental level. She also has 10 years of teaching experience in a secondary school and had been served as Head of Department, as well as a board member to Central Regional Health School, where she proved her skills in education and management. In addition, her role as Development Director of Henwood Trust with Māori (New Zealand’s indigenous people) communities demonstrated her leadership in developing and cultivating strategic relationships with indigenous people and diverse stakeholders to bring positive changes. Her track record of success in facilitating transformational outcomes for organizations and communities showcases her exceptional leadership skills and her ability to collaborate effectively with diverse stakeholders, including government officials, academics, professionals, Indigenous communities, philanthropy, and NGOs. These diverse cross-sector skill sets would equip her well to lead EAAFP to implement the Strategic Plan and CEPA Action Plan for the next years. We are thrilled as Ms. Jennifer George takes the helm as the Chief Executive of the EAAFP Secretariat. Please join us to welcome her to the Secretariat.    


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  • Farewell to Doug Watkins, Chief Executive of EAAFP Secretariat

    Mr. Doug Watkins at the EAAFP Secretariat © EAAFP Secretariat Today is the last working of Mr. Doug Watkins, Chief Executive of EAAFP Secretariat. Below is a farewell message from Doug. “It’s just over 3 years that I have had the pleasure of working with the Secretariat team to support the EAAF Partners with the implementation of the EAAFP Strategic Plan. With the successful convening of MOP11, delayed because of Covid, it’s now time for a new Chief Executive to step up. The Secretariat has an excellent team with Hyeseon Do as Senior Programme Officer, Vivian Fu, Senior Communications Officer; Hyojung Yoo the Finance Officer (seconded from Incheon Metropolitan), Yoon Kyung Lee as External Relations Manager (currently on maternity leave) and Yeonhee Ahn as Deputy (also seconded from Incheon Metropolitan). The Secretariat also has several additional staff (Yeonah Ku, Jisun Lee) on contract and several interns that work in the various teams. Covid had a significant impact on how the Secretariat worked for the Partners. It limited international travel and in response the Secretariat greatly increase its use of the internet to convene online meetings. The Flyway Site Network of internationally important sites for migratory waterbirds forms core of the work of the EAAFP. The Site Network has now grown to 152 sites in 19 countries of the Flyway. However, there are hundreds of additional internationally important wetlands for migratory waterbirds in the EAAFP. I encourage Partners to identify additional wetland sites to be nominated for the Flyway Site Network. The Secretariat has taken an active role in providing input to the development by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) called “Regional Flyway Initiative”. This initiative will enable the EAAFP Government Partners (in eligible countries) to implement actions for the conservation on internationally important wetlands for migratory waterbirds. These activities will not only address the ecology of the sites, but also address the interactions of local communities that depend on these wetlands.”   Mr. Robb Kaler, Immediate past Chair of EAAFP delivered his tribute to Doug for his leadership to the EAAFP.   “Doug has over 30 years of international experience in working on migratory waterbirds and wetland conservation in our flyway and his extensive knowledge and enormous list of contacts across the Flyway have made him a key player. Doug was one of the original team working with the Australian Government towards the development of the EAAFP concept as a Type II initiative during the World Summit of Sustainable Development in 2002, which later officially established the EAAFP in 2006. Doug’s involvement in the Flyway began while working for the Australasian Wader Study Group (AWSG) from 1993 to 1995. Doug then moved on wearing the hat of Wetlands International between 1995 and 2013. Following his role with Wetlands International, Doug worked with Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) secretariat as EAAF Coordinator for its Arctic Migratory Bird Initiative (AMBI) between 2018 and 2019. Doug’s involvement in the Partnership ranges from Chair of EAAFP Monitoring Task Force, past Chair of Yellow Sea Task Force to being a member of the Management Committee and he was instrumental in the drafting the EAAFP Strategic Plans including the latest Strategic Plan 2019-2028. Doug’s strong experience and management of a diverse group of partners has been crucial to the implementation of the EAAFP’s 10-year strategic plan. Doug worked hard to align and promote activities in the Flyway to address points laid out in the plan. The 32-page Secretariat report is a testimony to the outstanding work that Doug and the Secretariat staff, including the Science Unit. Thanks to Doug leading the EAAFP Secretariat and the Partnership since 2019, we have a bright future. Please join me in thanking Doug for his amazing contributions to the Flyway Partnership, both as the Chief Executive, as well as all of his work prior to joining the Secretariat. I am hoping that like many others that have left leadership roles in the Flyway, that have a tendency to continue to show up at these MOPs where they continue to provide invaluable contributions. I look forward to our paths crossing in the future.” The Secretariat is working on the process of new CE recruitment. The staff at the Secretariat will maintain the work for the EAAFP with support from Management Committee.


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  • MOP11 concluded with stronger commitment in collaboration for conserving migratory waterbirds in East Asian-Australasian Flyway

    The EAAFP 11th Meeting of Partners (MOP11) held in Brisbane, Australia, on 17 March, 2023 ended with the adoption of 11 Decisions, the election and appointment of new Management Committee, and the announcement of EAAFP as official partner to World Migratory Bird Day. After 4 days of intensive discussion, the closing day of EAAFP concluded with the adoption of 11 Decisions. These include the (highlighted DD to be named: new CEPA Action Plan 2023 – 2028, new Guidelines for National, Site and Sister Site Partnerships, Maintaining up-to-date Population Estimates and Trends of Migratory Waterbird Populations for the EAAFP, Youth mainstreaming, and more, which will guide Partners, Site managers, collaborators and other stakeholders to take concrete actions for the conservation of migratory waterbirds and wetlands in East Asian-Australasian Flyway (EAAF). During the plenary, a special presentation was given by Her Excellency, Clare Fearnley, former New Zealand Ambassador to China in a recorded message. She shared the launch of ‘Friends of the Flyway’ which she initiated, to celebrate the migratory birds of the EAAF, bringing together ambassadors and senior diplomats. Mr. Suh Sheung-Oh, Director of the Ramsar Regional Centre – East Asia, shared the recently combined Wetland Link International – Asia-Oceania, which is a network of wetland education centres and site managers. H.E. Clare Fearnley, former New Zealand Ambassador to China delivered recorded message ©EAAFP Secretariat Mr. Suh Sheung-Oh, Director of RRC-EA, shared Wetland Link International – Asia-Oceania ©EAAFP Secretariat Youth representative, Hou Shuyu, winner of the Youth Think Tank Competition from China and Lena Van Swinderen from Australia presented a vision from the youth perspective for how they could be engaged in EAAFP, as well we the youth Declaration of 2020 Flyway Youth Forum was presented at the plenary. It is followed by presentations by Sponsors to the MOP11 – Ms. Alison Russell-French and Birgita Hansen on behalf of the Australasian Wader Study Group and Ms. May-Le Ng for Faunatech. After that, the plenary session continued with discussion on the election and appointment of the Management Committee, Technical SubCommittee and Finance Subcommittee. Australia became the Chair and Cambodia as the Vice Chair of the Management Committee. The highlight towards the end of the MOP11 was an announcement of EAAFP as the Official Partner of World Migratory Bird Day, an annual global campaign to raise awareness of migratory birds. Recorded video messages from Amy Fraenkel, Executive Secretary of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species, Dr. Jacques Trouvilliez, AEWA's Executive Secretary and Dr. Susan Bonfield, Executive Director of Environment for the Americas were delivered to convey the celebratory messages to welcome EAAFP as the new Partner to the World Migratory Bird Day, followed by a speech from Mr. Robb Kaler, Chair of EAAFP to announce the official Partnership (link). Closing remarks by Dr. Ilse Kiessling, Assistant Secretary, Protected Species and Communities Branch, Biodiversity Conservation Division, DCCEEW ©EAAFP Secretariat Closing remarks by Mr. Robb Kaler, Chair of EAAFP©EAAFP Secretariat Closing remarks by Mr. Doug Watkins, Chief Executive of EAAFP Secretariat ©EAAFP Secretariat At the closing ceremony, Mr. Robb Kaler, Chair of EAAFP commented“As you all know, the Partners adopted a 10-year Strategic Plan at MOP10 to guide our Partners. A plan is just a document if there is no implementation, but today we are fortunate to see many Partners and stakeholders are all paying efforts towards the same goal: To conserve migratory waterbirds, their habitats, and the livelihoods of people who depend on them.” Mr. Doug Watkins, Chief Executive of EAAFP said “It has been fantastic to meet with the Partners again. I hope the meeting has reinvigorated us to work smarter for the conservation of internationally important wetlands and the migratory waterbirds they support.” Learn more about MOP11 and updates: https://eaaflyway.net/11th-meeting-of-partners-mop-11/ News release of MOP11 by Partners: Hanns Seidel Foundation Korea: https://korea.hss.de/en/news/detail/weltzugvogeltag-2023-news9958/ Mygoyang News (Korean): https://www.mygoyang.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=7223 ABC News: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-04-25/proposed-development-on-protected-wetlands-at/102265270


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  • The East Asian – Australasian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) kicked off the 11th Meeting of Partners in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia to jointly conserve migratory waterbirds from the most threatened flyway in the world

    Group photo of EAAFP © EAAFP Secretariat On 13th March, the 11th Meeting of Partners (MOP11) of the East - Australasian Asian Flyway Partnership (EAAFP) officially kicked off in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, under the theme “We are all part of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway!”. Co-hosted by the Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water, Australian Government and BirdLife Australia, and sponsored by Australasian Wader Study Group and Faunatech, the meeting brought together over 150 participants from 18 national governments, inter-government organizations, international NGOs, site managers, experts and corporates. The delegates will lead the discussion on the eleventh key Draft Decisions to find a solution and better direction to conserve migratory waterbirds, their habitats and livelihoods in the Flyway. The meeting was opened with a traditional aboriginal Welcome to Country performance delivered by Tribal Experiences.  The MOP11 was officially opened through welcome remarks by the co-hosts, Dr Ilse Kiessling, Assistant Secretary, Protected Species and Communities Branch, Biodiversity Conservation Division, Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water, and Prof. Martine Maron, President of BirdLife Australia. Dr Ilse Kiessling, Assistant Secretary, Protected Species and Communities Branch, Biodiversity Conservation Division, DCCEEW © EAAFP Secretariat Prof. Martine Maron, President of BirdLife Australia © EAAFP Secretariat   "We are thrilled to bring together our partners from across the Flyway to share knowledge, learn from one another, and plan for the future of migratory waterbird conservation," said Martine Maron, President of BirdLife Australia, co-host of MOP11. "This meeting is a critical opportunity to engage with a diverse group of stakeholders and strengthen our collective efforts to protect the flyway." Dr. Musonda Mumba, Secretary General of the Ramsar Convention also delivered a recorded congratulatory message to EAAFP MOP11. After, Mr. Robb Kaler, Chair of EAAFP gave opening remarks, followed by a memorial ceremony dedicated to Dr. Lew Young, former Chief Executive of the EAAFP Secretariat, and Dr Evgeny Syroechkovskiy, former EAAFP Spoon-billed Sandpiper Task Force Chair and Focal Point of Russia. In his opening remarks, Mr. Robb Kaler, Chair of EAAFP said “No single country can conserve all the migratory waterbirds, only if we collaborate and amplify our effort can the waterbirds be conserved and wetlands be sustainably managers, “highlighted Mr. Robb Kaler, Chair of EAAFP. “I hope that this MOP proves to bolster the effort of the Partnership to continue their tireless work of preservation of migratory birds and their habitats within our precious Flyway.” Dr. Musonda Mumba, Secretary General of the Ramsar Convention © EAAFP Secretariat Mr. Robb Kaler, Chair of EAAFP © EAAFP Secretariat During the opening ceremony, the Partnership welcomed the two new Partners, Hong Kong Bird Watching Society and Mangrove Foundation, and 11 new Flyway Network Sites from Australia, Cambodia, China, Japan, Myanmar and the Republic of Korea since the 10th Meeting of Partners (MOP10). Two Sister Sites agreements were celebrated between Incheon, Republic of Korea and Hong Kong S.A.R., China, as well as Saga City, Japan and Alaska, U.S.A. Mr. Yat-tung Yu, Director of new Partner, Hong Kong Bird Watching Society (HKBWS), said, “Hong Kong lies in the middle of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. Thousands of waterbirds including globally threatened Black-faced Spoonbill, Spoon-billed Sandpiper and Saunders’s Gull utilise Mai Po Inner Deep Bay Flyway Site for wintering and passage. The HKBWS is privileged to join the EAAFP and eager to work with other partners for more collaborative and impactful conservation activities to protect waterbirds and their habitats with local, regional and global perspectives." Dr. Baohua Yan,  Secretary-general of new Partner, Mangrove Foundation (MCF), expressed  “MCF is a leading wetland and biodiversity conservation charity in China, with the mission of living wetlands and sustainable future. It employs a social participation model for nature conservation through adaptive management of protected areas, CEPA (wetland education and public engagement), network building, grantmaking and international collaboration. It does this through strategic projects, such as Saving the Spoon-billed Sandpipers, Mangrove Conservation and Restoration, Active Wetland Management in Shenzhen Bay, and China Wetland Center Network.” Mr Yat Tung Yu,  Director of Hong Kong Bird Watching Society, New Partner to EAAFP © EAAFP Secretariat Ms. Sun Lili, Founder, and Board Member, Mangrove Foundation, New Partner to EAAFP © EAAFP Secretariat  Following the Ceremonies, Prof. Richard Fuller from the University of Queensland gave a keynote presentation, illustrating the critical situation that some shorebirds are declining, and how we can save the migratory waterbirds. After the opening ceremony, two side events to introduce and discuss the revised CEPA Action Plan and the new Guidelines of National, Site and Sister Site Partnerships, as well as "Green Energy and Conservation of Migratory Birds" respectively.  In the afternoon plenary session, the Partners adopted the Rules of Procedure and elected Australia as Chair and U.S.A. as Vice Chair to the MOP11. At the end of the first day, BirdLife Australia organized the opening performance, music played by Bowerbird Collective, with a song “Life on Land's Edge “, and the participants to MOP11 were treated to the opening reception hosted by the Australian Government and BirdLife Australia. In the upcoming meeting, Partners and collaborators will contribute to discussing Document papers and 11 Decision papers, which will enhance efficiency in Partnership operation, including CEPA Action Plan, and establishing the new guidelines of national, site and Sister Site Partnerships, Population Estimates and Trends of Migratory Waterbird Populations. In the following days until 17th March, there will also be 11 side events organized to foster collaboration, knowledge-sharing, and strengthening the Partnership in the future, and working towards synergizing the work of EAAFP with Multilateral Environment Agreements (MEAs) and different regional conservation initiatives and mechanisms. Opening performance "Life on Land's Edge “ music played by Bowerbird Collective © EAAFP Secretariat Learn more about MOP11 and updates: https://eaaflyway.net/11th-meeting-of-partners-mop-11/ Photo album on 13th March: https://www.flickr.com/photos/eaafp/sets/72177720307070189/


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