• Yeongjong Migratory Birds and Mudflats Event 2018

    Participants holding the placard “Our Pride, Yeongjongdo Tidal Flat” ©Jung-bu Ilbo On 2nd June, EAAFP staff members participated in Yeongjong (Incheon) Migratory Birds and Mudflats Event as a sponsor. Starting from 2016, it was held the third time this year and co-organized by Incheon Bridge Co., Ltd, Green Incheon (Local NGO), and ii-rang which is a center for ecological education in Republic of Korea, with the purpose of sharing the ecological importance in Yeongjong Island and Incheon. In the morning, 150 young participants who applied the programme in advance explored mudflats and birdwatching with mudflat guides. Children’s laughter continued whenever they were walking in mudflat and found creatures like macrophthalmus, lugworms in the area. Mudflat guide said, “Guys, look at the Heron over there, they are waiting for us to leave because here are their habitats with plenty of their foods, so please let the creatures back to the mudflat for themselves and birds.” After the field experience in mudflat, they washed their feet and headed to watch the birds with telescope. In the afternoon, the second session began with taking an oath from two Korean kids for conserving the mudflats and protecting nature. Each person from sponsors and organizations co-organized this event delivered a welcoming speech. Mr. Suhong Kim, CEO of Incheon bridge Co., Ltd, said he expected for future generation to find the importance of sustainable development through this event, and to find the importance of Mudflat area as well. Also, Mr. Lew Young, Chief Executive of EAAFP, welcomed children by asking “what did you do(see) in Mudflat today?” firstly. With active answers from passionate kids, he stressed the importance of mudflats as habitat for birds and migratory birds. Lew Young, Chief Executive of EAAFP ©Minshil/EAAFP Children also enjoyed activities by joining OX environmental quizzes and visiting various booths including photography exhibition of mudflat and migratory birds, face-painting, coloring eco-bag, making own badge, and so on. Despite strong sun-shine, there were a lot of people lining up in front of each booth for activities. It was great time for public awareness about how Incheon Mudflat is important and beautiful it is. While there are still many things to do to ensure the future of migratory birds dependant on the Yeongjongdo, today is a great start to inform people to do an action.   For more photo, click here      


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  • Office Visit of U.S. High Schoolers

    Figure1 Group Photo ©Mijin/EAAFP The 22 enthusiastic high-school students from US visited EAAFP Secretariat office on 12 July 2018. “Do you have any favorite bird in your mind?” Hyeseon Do, Programme Officer in EAAFP, started with this question and continued to explain about EAAFP. She detailed works in EAAFP such as Partners Working Groups, Task Forces, World Migratory Bird Day event, EAAF Sites in Alaska and so on. Not only about the what we do, she talked about what has been changed after our works as well. She rounded out her presentation showing video about conserving Spoon-billed Sandpipers’ journey directed by Vivian Fu. Figure 2 Lecture from Danhak ©Mijin/EAAFP In the touched atmosphere, provoking them to do conservation activity, Danhak Gu who is a Programme Assistant began her presentation while telling the beautiful life story of Bar-tailed Godwits. She pointed out the importance of habitat as a stopover site for migratory birds including Bar-tailed Godwit who flies long distance in the life time of over 10 years equal to the trip to the moon. “Let’s say if you are planning to make a road trip from Portland, Oregon to New Hampshire, you need to drop by gas station to refuel your car. Otherwise your car will be shut down in the middle of nowhere. Likewise, these birds need to refuel themselves to make all the way to their final destination” she added. Given the information, students are told how they can do for conserving activities. Danhak also introduced many activities they can do easily. In addition, she explained EAAFP Social Network Services and how to join the international/national organization. We could see their potential to be a leader of conservationist and what they want to be. Figure 3 To Our Winged Travellers ©Mijin/EAAFP As a last session of presentation, there were group activities in bingo game which is coordinated by Minshil and Mijin, Programme assistants, under the theme of ecology and participating our project "To Our Winged Travellers". They wrote the message for migratory birds on EAAF with love and beautiful drawings. The bingo game was so special because they should explain their words to their friends and share thoughts. Also, two players who had one bingo line firstly got the gifts. The first winner took a guide book of Waterbirds of ASEAN and second winner got the T-shirt, with handkerchief and Far Eastern Curlew badge. Lew Young, Chief Executive of EAAFP, gave a closing remarks for the students. “How are you going to tell what you’ve learned here to your eight-year-old sister?” he started with this question. He also mentioned the importance of conserving flyway reaching to Alaska as well. With the hope they will push an effort on conservation activities in the near future, we took a photo with Spoon-billed Sandpiper at the office. For more photos, click here.


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  • Farewell to Programme Assistant Danhak

    WMBD Seminar preparation with previous interns Written by Danhak Gu What I learned during my internship at the EAAFP is that communication is important. Through working with people with different backgrounds I was able to learn how to communicate better with one another. For example, when one unexpected task was given to me, I spoke to Tomoko and talked about my thoughts and difficulties. The reason I could do so was that she was a great listener, encouraging and was showing respect to all staff members. I was given a very good advice, was able to become more positive and even got my work reallocated. It made me realize that showing respect and care is very important communication skill, and I was encouraged to be an encouraging person to our staff members and future interns. Second of all, I was surprised to see the level of efforts that the EAAFP has made towards the conservation of Flyway sites in DPR Korea. During my internship period, the DPR Korea became the 36th Member to the Partnership. Followingly the office closely worked with other international and national organizations for cooperation. While supporting the office in organizing associated events such as a DPRK briefing session, I was really able to see the big picture of the EAAFP’s overall mission and realized that this can greatly contribute not only to conservation of migratory waterbirds and habitats, but also to promoting peace and even to unification of the two Koreas. Last but not the least, I am very grateful and happy about the fact that I learned about our winged friends and their habitats. In addition to the daily office work, I had several chances to join birdwatching activities and conservation campaigns held in Incheon and Cheolwon[EAAFP027]. It allowed me to understand over watching many of migratory waterbirds such as Black-faced Spoonbill, and Cranes. I visited National Institute of Ecology in Seocheon, learning about our beautiful mother nature; and participate in conservation workshops, seeing great cooperation from all over the world. Overall, I really learned and realized a lot during my 6-month internship. I do believe this opportunity of working as an intern of the EAAFP Secretariat was a great stepping stone as both personal development-wise and knowledge-wise. Photo Credit to Eugene Cheah / EAAFP


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  • International Workshop and Training on the Conservation of the Intertidal Wetlands of Yellow/West Sea

    The Venue of the Yellow/West Sea Working Group's 2nd Workshop The Yellow/West Sea Working Group successfully held its 2nd workshop on 9 July in Shanghai (China), with representatives from the governments of China, DPR Korea and RO Korea, as well as supporters such as international organizations, NGOs and other experts, to discuss future cooperation for the conservation of the Yellow/West Sea coastal wetlands and tidal flats. The workshop began with validating the Terms of Reference of the Working Group and identifying the members from each country. This was followed by a presentation on the conservation of the tidal flats of the Waddensea between the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark, as a case study of tri-lateral cooperation for the conservation and sustainable use of coastal wetlands for the benefit of local people and the environment. Ms. PANG Un-Gyong (Ministry of Land and Environmental Protection, DPR Korea) delivering a presentation   The workshop also heard updates from representatives of the three Yellow/West Sea countries about the status of their coastal wetlands and steps being taken to conserve and restore them. These were also updates on progress with the designation of World Heritage Sites along the coastal wetlands of China and the RO Korea, and the work of the UNDP-GEF Yellow Sea Large Marine Ecosystem projects in conserving the Yellow Sea ecosystem. There were positive discussions during and along the sidelines of the workshop about possible areas of future cooperation, such as on the sharing of good practices for policy, site management and education and public awareness. We now look forward to the next meeting in early 2019. Photo Credit to Lew Young / EAAFP Secretariat    


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  • R.O. Korea to Restore 3㎢ of Tidal Flats from 2019-2023 at an annual cost of KRW 19.5 billion

    Translated by EAAFP Secretariat Original article:  5년간 갯벌 3㎢ 복원, 연간 195억 원 갯벌가치 되살린다   - The Ministry of Ocean and Fisheries established ‘Mid and Long-Term Ocean Restoration Plan (2019-2023)' - On 9th July, the Minister of the Ministry of Ocean and Fisheries (Mr. Young-Choon Kim) announced the ‘Mid and Long-Term Ocean Restoration Plan for 2019 - 2023’ that will expand the target area for tidal flat restoration projects, the reinforcement of project management system and enlarge the incentive in restored area to revive the value of tidal flats. The project will focus on the restoration of abandoned tidal flats, such as salt pan or fish farms, and will also recover the old and severed mudflat channels which, for example, have been cut off by bridges. The project will also prepare and distribute technical guidelines for standardized restoration projects to drastically reduce trial and errors that may occur in future projects. In 2010, the restoration project for tidal flat ecosystem was initiated but without a mid or long-term plan. As a result, the project ended with only nine sites being restored over a nine year period, covering 1.08㎢ of tidal flat and 3.4㎞ of tidal flat waterway. As a result, it was hard to feel the effects of the restoration project. Also, the project’s characteristics combined with various elements such as marine ecology, marine resources and civil engineering techniques made it difficult to design projects, execute construction projects, and secure budgets. In addition, some local governments were reluctant to carry out the project due to insufficient incentives for the area concerned. Under the new Plan, the Ministry included the mid-term plan for the new tidal flats restoration project to improve the proposed defects in the previous project and to vitalize the project more. According to the project plan, the Ministry will restore 23 tidal flats from 2019 to 2023 at an annual cost of (19.5 billion Won). Among them, 14 restoration projects will be completed by 2023, covering 3 square kilometers of tidal flats and 3 kilometers of tidal flat waterways. Restoration work on another nine sites will be completed by 2024-2025. The project will also promote sustainable tidal flat fishery and boost local customized ecotourism through branding the restored tidal flats that will benefit the local residents. Mr. Myoung, Ro-hyun (Director, Marine Ecology Division) said that, “By implementing the mid and long-term plan without any disruptions, we will revive the tidal flats by providing an average of 19.5 billion Won per year. It will be of help for the local economy as the enhancement of tidal flats, the fishery and ecotourism are expected by returning restored tidal flats to local people.” Meanwhile, the Ministry is in the process of legislating ‘Act on Sustainable Management and Restoration of Tidal Flats’ to maintain, restore, and use tidal flats with diverse functions and values, including the promotion of public awareness on tidal flats, designation of clean (uncontaminated) tidal flats, pollution purification, and restoration. Target Area List for Restoration Plan [Type of restoration] Mudflat restoration: restoration of mudflats left as abandoned salt pans or aquaculture farms by breaking dykes Seawater circulation (A): restoration of mudflats isolated by roads or bridges Seawater circulation (B): restoration of mudflats which have low rate of seawater circulation by structures such abolished seawall


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  • Developing Waterbirds and Habitats Database of China’s Coasts Project

    ⓒEAAFP On 27 June 2018, Dr. Lew Young, the Chief Executive of the EAAFP Secretariat attended the project meeting of the “Developing Waterbirds and Habitats Database of China’s Coast”. From 2014-2015, the Paulson Institute carried out the important China Coastal Blueprint Project to review the status of China coastal wetlands along the Bohai and Yellow Seas, and to give recommendations on the way forward for the conservation of these wetlands. The project was funded by the Lao Niu Foundation and the Paulson Institute, and the EAAFP was one of the members of the project Steering Committee. The Blueprint Project identified the problem of a lack of long-term data on waterbirds use of the wetlands along the Bohai and Yellow Sea coast which could be used to distinguish further areas for conservation. Therefore, a follow-up project was developed to produce an online application where information on waterbirds count and distribution along the Bohai and Yellow Sea coast can be recorded by interested birdwatchers. The project would be conducted by the Institute of Geographical Science and Natural Resources, Chinese Academy of Science. The project period is from March 2018 to December 2019.


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  • North-West Australia Wader and Tern Expedition 2019

    The Australasian Wader Studies Group (a special interest group of BirdLife Australia) has organized a series of special expeditions over the years in order to undertake comprehensive long-term studies of the waders and terns in North-West Australia. The next expedition will take place from 2nd to 24th February 2019. For more information, please download the PDF file below. Download the PDF here: NWA Epedition 2019 Introduction (666KB)


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  • China-ASEAN Wildlife Conservation Training Workshop

    Dr. Lew Young, the Chief Executive of the…


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  • Request for proposals: the grants for the “Recovery of Species on the Brink of Extinction” by National Geographic

    The mandate of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC) is to “stimulate, promote and support conservation actions for halting biodiversity decline, preventing species’ extinctions, and restoring and conserving intact habitats and ecosystems, both on the ground and in the water”. In partnership with the IUCN SSC, the goal of this request for funding is to halt further biodiversity decline by implementing species conservation plans. We will support on the ground priorities of IUCN SSC Species Conservation Plans (e.g. Action Plans, Conservation Strategies, Population and Habitat Viability Assessments) as well as conservation actions that are endorsed by the relevant IUCN SSC Species Specialist Group. Applications must explicitly address priorities defined in published action plans, which you can find here and here. If no plan for a particular species has been published, the proposal must include a letter of endorsement by the relevant IUCN SSC Species Specialist Group, indicating that the proposal indeed addresses a priority conservation action. Funds are not restricted by taxon or region; proposals must include principal investigators or participants resident in the country where the fieldwork will be conducted and show indication of legal permission to conduct the work if funds are granted. DETAILS Proposals that focus on the following themes are encouraged: Specific and defensible priority actions to avert a species decline; Projects that include the active involvement of early career conservationists; Projects that support conservation leaders from the countries where the species occur Typical proposal requests should be less than $30,000; however, applicants may request up to $50,000. Successful applicants may use awarded funds over one or two years. Up to 20 percent of the total can be used as a stipend for the applicant and/or team members. (Please see the Preparing Your Proposal page regarding stipend eligibility and other budgetary guidance.) All applications should include a clear review of the state of knowledge about the topic and a plan for evaluating the outcomes of the proposed work. Preference will be given to proposals that include feasible plans to demonstrate change in key, quantifiable indicators of: for example, reduction in drivers of population decline (e.g. unsustainable hunting, fishing or logging); or increase in numbers, degree of protection, or connectivity of populations of the target species. For any questions, please write to speciesrecovery@ssc.iucn.org. When applying for this RFP, please select Wildlife in the Lens dropdown menu on the Project Description tab of the application. The deadline for application is 10th July with decisions announced by November. For more information, visit https://www.nationalgeographic.org/grants/grant-opportunities/species-recovery/


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  • Special Donation from Chadwick International School

    Since 2014, the EAAFP Secretariat and Chadwick International School (Incheon, Republic of Korea) have built a good relationship through organizing educational lectures on conserving migratory waterbirds and habitats for young students. The school is located in Songdo International City which is home to the EAAFP Secretariat. The former EAAFP communication officer, Ms. Tomoko Ichikawa, delivered several lectures to the Chadwick elementary school students while she was working for the Secretariat. More recently, Ms. Tomoko Ichikawa, gave a lecture to third grade students at Chadwick in March 2018. She introduced migratory waterbirds and tidal flats of the Incheon area to the students, emphasizing the ecological importance of Songdo tidal flat as one of the 2,301 internationally important wetlands (Ramsar Site) in the world, providing a habitat to various waterbird species. The participating students showed a lot of interest in not only migratory waterbirds but also all the different living creatures in the tidal flats. After the lecture, the students were invited to participate in interactive activities about the food chain of the tidal flat. Through the lecture and the interactive activities, students were able to understand why the tidal flats are so important for conservation of both migratory waterbirds and human being as well. After the lecture, more detailed information was transmitted by the Chadwick teachers to the students. After the sessions, the students created collagraph prints of various bird species assisted by their art teacher, Ms. Gigi Maiquez. These hand-made prints were sold at the Chadwick business bazaar organized later and the students were able to raise some money. Gratefully, the students were able to donate the money raised (KRW 277,000) to the EAAFP Secretariat for supporting the EAAFP’s Spoon-billed Sandpiper Task Force for their conservation efforts. On Thursday, June 7th 2018, five 3rd grade students and Ms. Gigi Maiquez visited the EAAFP Secretariat office to present the donation. They also brought their collagraph prints as well as a hand-writing message card to the Secretariat. The message read “We, the third graders at Chadwick International hope that our small donation of KRW 277,000 will help you protect the migratory birds. We have learned to take care of our environment in our own small ways”. What lovely words!! The Secretariat staff members were touched by their message. The Secretariat truly appreciates this special donation from the Chadwick students and we hope to continue the cooperation with the Chadwick in the future. The EAAFP Secretariat is highly proud of these young students: Edward Kang, Daniel Lee, Nicholas Taylor, Connor Feitel and William Kim. More pictures of their artwork can be found on our Flickr.


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